Tag Archives: supplements

How To Use Herbs And Supplements Wisely. Part 2 of 3

How To Use Herbs And Supplements Wisely – Part 2 of 3

The average age of those who responded was 48 years. About three-quarters of them were men, and about three-quarters were white, the lessons noted. The specialists polled talked about supplements with 41 percent of their patients. However, doctors initiated only 26 percent of these discussions, the researchers found. The study also revealed that two out of three oncologists believed they didn’t have enough information about herbs and supplements to answer their patients’ questions.

chemotherapy

Of all the doctors surveyed, 59 percent said they had no education on these products. When asked about a suppositional patient with a curable form of cancer, 80 percent of the oncologists surveyed said they would actively discourage the use of an unknown herb with chemotherapy. Still, 86 percent of the doctors said that within the heretofore year they provided chemotherapy to at least one patient who was taking a dietary supplement.

And 90 percent said they would likely provide chemotherapy to a patient who insisted on taking an unknown herb – even if their cancer was curable with agreed treatment, according to the study. He was surprised by how many oncologists prescribed chemotherapy for patients who admitted taking herbs and supplements. “They realize it’s being done but are not talking about it enough. Dr Patricia Ganz, a medical oncologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, respected how readily available these supplements are.

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How To Use Herbs And Supplements Wisely. Part 1 of 3

How To Use Herbs And Supplements Wisely – Part 1 of 3

How To Use Herbs And Supplements Wisely. Despite concerns about potentially precarious interactions between cancer treatments and herbs and other supplements, most cancer doctors don’t language to their patients about these products, new research found. Fewer than half of cancer doctors – oncologists – bring up the subject of herbs or supplements with their patients, the researchers found. Many doctors cited their own shortage of information as a major reason why they skip that conversation. “Lack of knowledge about herbs and supplements, and awareness of that lack of knowledge is probably one of the reasons why oncologists don’t abecedarian the discussion,” said the study’s author, Dr Richard Lee, medical director of the Integrative Medicine Program at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

And “It’s surely about getting more research out there and more education so oncologists can feel comfortable having these conversations”. The study was published recently in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. People with cancer often twirl to herbs and other dietary supplements in an attempt to improve their health and cope with their symptoms, according to background information in the study. Although herbs and supplements are often viewed as “natural,” they contain active ingredients that might cause poisonous interactions with standard cancer treatments.

Some supplements can cause skin reactions when taken by patients receiving radiation treatment, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). Herbs and supplements can also affect how chemotherapy drugs are rapt and metabolized by the body, according to the ACS. St John’s wort, Panax ginseng and green tea supplements are among those that can produce potentially dangerous interactions with chemotherapy, according to the study. For the prevailing survey, the researchers asked almost 400 oncologists about their views and knowledge of supplements.

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German Scientists Have Found That Many Food Supplements For Weight Loss Are No Better Than Placebo. Part 2 of 2

German Scientists Have Found That Many Food Supplements For Weight Loss Are No Better Than Placebo – Part 2 of 2

While some participants lost weight, there wasn’t a significant difference between those who took the placebos and those who took the right supplements, they reported. At least some of the supplements are available in the United States. “L-Carnitine is in US supplements, polyglucosamide is found in chitosan, which is still in some weight-loss supplements, and guarana was ordered removed from weight-loss supplements, but it has slowly worked its street back into some products,” said Connie Diekman, director of university nutrition at Washington University in St Louis and former president of the American Dietetic Association.

overweight

And “The pipeline message here that I would encourage people to hear is that medications aren’t the magic answer to weight loss. Changes in eating and activity behaviors are the carry to long-term changes in weight. For those who are extremely overweight, or those whose health is at risk, a conversation with their physician about some of the prescription drugs is advisable, but even then changes in behavior are key to maintenance of a healthier weight” dr bilquis niswani husn barhane ki tips. The observe findings were scheduled to be released Monday at the International Congress on Obesity in Stockholm.

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German Scientists Have Found That Many Food Supplements For Weight Loss Are No Better Than Placebo. Part 1 of 2

German Scientists Have Found That Many Food Supplements For Weight Loss Are No Better Than Placebo – Part 1 of 2

German Scientists Have Found That Many Food Supplements For Weight Loss Are No Better Than Placebo. A humongous mass of weight-loss supplements don’t appear to work any better than placebos (or fake supplements) at helping people shed pounds, a new study has found. German researchers tested placebos against weight-loss supplements that are renowned in Europe. The supplements were touted as having these ingredients: L-Carnitine, polyglucosamine, cabbage powder, guarana seed powder, bean extract, Konjac extract, fiber, sodium alginate and permanent plant extracts.

So “We found that not a single product was any more effective than placebo pills in producing weight loss over the two months of the study, regardless of how it claims to work,” said researcher Thomas Ellrott, headman of the Institute for Nutrition and Psychology at the University of Gottingen Medical School in Germany, in a news release from the International Congress on Obesity in Stockholm, Sweden. The researchers tested the products and placebos on 189 heavy or overweight people, of whom 74 percent finished the eight-week study.

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Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) Supplements For Breast-Feeding Mothers Is Good For Premature Infants. Part 3 of 3

Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) Supplements For Breast-Feeding Mothers Is Good For Premature Infants – Part 3 of 3

But what does the future hold for these babies? Many survivors grow up healthy; others aren’t so lucky. Even the best of care cannot always spare a immature baby from lasting disabilities such as cerebral palsy, mental retardation and learning problems, chronic lung disease, and vision and hearing problems. Half of all neurological disabilities in children are reciprocal to premature birth.

Although doctors have made tremendous advances in caring for babies born too small and too soon, we need to find out how to prevent preterm birth from happening in the first place. Despite decades of research, scientists have not yet developed remarkable ways to help prevent premature delivery.

In fact, the rate of premature birth increased by 36 percent between the early 1980s and 2006. This incline and the dynamics underlying it underscore the critical importance and timeliness of the March of Dimes Prematurity Campaign ki kore sex power batabo. In 2007, a small but statistically significant decrease occurred: to 12,7 percent.

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Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) Supplements For Breast-Feeding Mothers Is Good For Premature Infants. Part 2 of 3

Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) Supplements For Breast-Feeding Mothers Is Good For Premature Infants – Part 2 of 3

So “Our study has shown that supplementing mothers is a viable and effective way of providing DHA to low birthweight premature infants,” study author Dr Isabelle Marc, an assistant professor in the pediatrics department at Laval University in Quebec, said in a rumour release. The DHA content in the breast milk of mothers who don’t consume fish during the breast-feeding period is probably insufficient, according to Marc.

intervention

But “Our results underline the insistent need for recommendations addressing dietary DHA intake during lactation of mothers of very preterm infants to reach optimal DHA level in milk to be delivered to the coddle for optimal growth and neurodevelopment,” she concluded. The findings were presented Saturday at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in Vancouver.

Today more than 1400 babies in the US (1 in 8) will be born prematurely. Many will be too poor and too sick to go home. Instead, they face weeks or even months in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). These babies face an increased risk of solemn medical complications and death; however, most, eventually, will go home.

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Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) Supplements For Breast-Feeding Mothers Is Good For Premature Infants. Part 1 of 3

Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) Supplements For Breast-Feeding Mothers Is Good For Premature Infants – Part 1 of 3

Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) Supplements For Breast-Feeding Mothers Is Good For Premature Infants. Very underdeveloped infants have higher levels of DHA – an omega-3 fatty acid that’s important to the growth and development of the brain – when their breast-feeding mothers take DHA supplements, Canadian researchers have found. Researchers say a deficiency in DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) is plain in very preterm infants, possibly because the ordinary diets of many pregnant or breast-feeding women lack the essential fatty acid, which is found in cold water fatty fish and fish lubricate supplements.

The study included breast-feeding mothers of 12 infants born at 29 weeks gestation or earlier. The mothers were given high doses of DHA supplements until 36 weeks after conception. The mothers and babies in this intervention party were compared at day 49 to a control group of mothers of very preterm infants who didn’t take DHA supplements.

The levels of DHA in the core milk of mothers who took DHA supplements were nearly 12 times higher than in the milk of mothers in the control group. Infants in the intervention group received about seven times more DHA than those in the in check group. Plasma DHA concentrations in mothers and babies in the intervention group were two to three times higher than those in the control group.

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