Tag Archives: problems

Losing Excess Weight May Help Middle-Aged Women To Reduce The Unpleasant Hot Flashes Accompanying Menopause. Part 3 of 3

Losing Excess Weight May Help Middle-Aged Women To Reduce The Unpleasant Hot Flashes Accompanying Menopause – Part 3 of 3

Dr Elizabeth Poynor, an obstetrician-gynecologist affiliated with Lenox Hill Hospital, said the exploration findings are “good news. I think this study provides a ground work to look at it (hot flashes) in larger, more detailed and comprehensive studies. It’s very promising”.

Poynor said the contemplation provides an impetus to women who need to lose weight for other health reasons, such as diabetes or heart disease, because it can reduce problems like sleep hurly-burly that can lead to problems with concentration and poor functioning in general. “It can really help to have a very significant altered quality of life,” said Poynor, noting that the physiology of hot flashes, “at least in part a vascular event,” is poorly understood and needs more study myextendershop.com. “However, this study provides women and their health care professionals who care for them another intervention to help with bothersome hot flashes in women who are overweight”.

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Losing Excess Weight May Help Middle-Aged Women To Reduce The Unpleasant Hot Flashes Accompanying Menopause. Part 2 of 3

Losing Excess Weight May Help Middle-Aged Women To Reduce The Unpleasant Hot Flashes Accompanying Menopause – Part 2 of 3

They were also asked about their daily exercise, caloric intake, and screwy and physical functioning using instruments widely accepted in the medical field, said Huang. No correlation was found between any of these and a reduction in hot flashes, but “reduction in weight, body mass forefinger (BMI), and abdominal circumference were each associated with improvements” in reducing hot flashes, according to the study, published in the July 12 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

overweight

Huang said that caloric intake and work out were measured by the participants, who were not always accurate, but “weight can be measured by stepping on scale,” so weight loss is a “more accurate measure” of what happened. About 340 study participants, at least 30 years old, were recruited from a larger review of overweight and obese middle-aged women suffering from incontinence. They were not told the study was examining the effect of weight loss on hot flashes.

At the study’s start, about half of both the learning and control groups reported having hot flashes; about half of these were at least moderately bothered, and 8,4 percent were extremely bothered. By six months, 49 percent in the con group, compared with 41 percent in the control group, reported improvement by “at least one category of bothersomeness”.

That might not seem like a big difference. But Huang added that, “although 41 percent of women in the authority over group experienced improvement in hot flashes, quite of few of them experienced improvement by only one category of ‘bothersomeness’ (as opposed to two categories). Also, of those women in the authority group who did not experience improvement, relatively more of them experienced actual worsening of hot flashes (as opposed to no change)”.

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Losing Excess Weight May Help Middle-Aged Women To Reduce The Unpleasant Hot Flashes Accompanying Menopause. Part 1 of 3

Losing Excess Weight May Help Middle-Aged Women To Reduce The Unpleasant Hot Flashes Accompanying Menopause – Part 1 of 3

Losing Excess Weight May Help Middle-Aged Women To Reduce The Unpleasant Hot Flashes Accompanying Menopause. Weight deprivation might help middle-aged women who are overweight or plump reduce bothersome hot flashes accompanying menopause, according to a new study. “We’ve known for some time that obesity affects hot flashes, but we didn’t positive if losing weight would have any effect,” said Dr Alison Huang, the study’s author. “Now there is good evidence losing weight can reduce hot flashes”.

Study participants were part of an all-out lifestyle-intervention program designed to help them lose between 7 percent and 9 percent of their weight. Huang, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of California, San Francisco, said the findings could afford women with another reason to take control of their weight. “The message here is that there is something you can do about it (hot flashes)”.

About one third of women experience hot flashes for five years or more days beyond recall menopause, “disrupting sleep, interfering with work and leisure activities, and exacerbating anxiety and depression,” according to the study. The women in the study group met with experts in nutrition, exercise and behavior weekly for an hour and were encouraged to trouble at least 200 minutes a week and reduce caloric intake to 1200-1500 calories per day. They also got help planning menus and choosing what kinds of foods to eat.

Women in a power group received monthly group education classes for the first four months. Participants, including those in the control group, were asked to respond to a survey at the beginning of the mull over and six months later to describe how bothersome hot flashes were for them in the past month on a five-point scale with answers ranging from “not at all” to “extremely”.

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The Impact Of Mobile Phones On Children In The Womb Leads To Behavior Problems. Part 3 of 3

The Impact Of Mobile Phones On Children In The Womb Leads To Behavior Problems – Part 3 of 3

Compared to children with no exposure to cell phones, those exposed both before and after birth were 50 percent more likely to display behavior problems, the study found. Children exposed to cell phones in the womb, but not after they were born, showed a 40 percent higher danger of borderline behavior problems. And those not exposed to cell phones before birth, but who were using them by age seven, were 20 percent more likely to have behavior problems.

One pro on child development who was not involved in the study commented favorably on its design. “The study’s methodology was rigorous and responsible. The researchers took into account as many possible variables as they could, given the limitations of the facts set,” said Dr Andrew Adesman, chief of developmental and behavioral pediatrics at the Steven and Alexandra Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York in New Hyde Park.

More than 285 million Americans no use room phones, according to the Cellular Telecommunications and Internet Association. Some studies have raised concern that the radiofrequency energy from cell phones may ostentation a risk to human health, but the association between cell phone use and health problems, including cancer and brain tumors, hasn’t been conclusively proven. In the past few years, additional sources of radiofrequency energy, such as wireless networks and radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags used to track products, collect tolls on highways, and speed up checkout lines-have become increasingly widespread, the survey said.

While there’s no reason for pregnant women to avoid using their cell phones, “precautionary measures might be warranted”. A simple way to reduce radiofrequency exposure is to use a cell phone’s spieler mode or a headset to place more distance between your body or head and the phone. Dr Adesman agreed. “The most conservative and perhaps prudent approach would be for both pregnant women and very young children to shorten their cell phone exposure enlargement. The risks seem to be small, but nonetheless, based on this study, they’re hard to dismiss”.

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The Impact Of Mobile Phones On Children In The Womb Leads To Behavior Problems. Part 2 of 3

The Impact Of Mobile Phones On Children In The Womb Leads To Behavior Problems – Part 2 of 3

Based on their scores, the children in the bone up were classified as normal, borderline, or abnormal for behavior. After analyzing the data, the researchers found that 18 percent of the children were exposed to cell phones before and after birth, up from 10 percent in the 2008 study, and 35 percent of seven-year-olds were using a chamber phone, up from 30,5 percent in 2008.

problems

Virtually none of the children in either study used a cell phone for more than an hour a week. The body then compared children’s cell-phone exposure both in utero and after birth adjusting for prematurity and birth weight; both parents’ childhood history of emotional problems or problems with attention or learning; a mother’s use of tobacco, alcohol, or drugs during pregnancy; breastfeeding for the earliest six months of life; and hours mothers spent with her child each day.

The investigators used the last two variables – breastfeeding and hours dog-tired each day with the child – as a proxy for the kind of attention mothers gave their young children. According to the study, this was partly to determine whether a mom who spent a lot of term talking on a cell phone during pregnancy or later might be less attentive to her children – something that might also be linked to behavior problems in her offspring.

And “If breastfeeding and time spent with children are good measures of mother’s attention, then we hold that our results do not support inattention as a likely explanation for the observed association,” the researchers wrote. The research did find an intriguing association between children’s exposure to apartment phones and their behavior.

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The Impact Of Mobile Phones On Children In The Womb Leads To Behavior Problems. Part 1 of 3

The Impact Of Mobile Phones On Children In The Womb Leads To Behavior Problems – Part 1 of 3

The Impact Of Mobile Phones On Children In The Womb Leads To Behavior Problems. Children exposed to cubicle phones in the womb and after lineage had a higher risk of behavior problems by their seventh birthday, possibly related to the electromagnetic fields emitted by the devices, a new study of nearly 29000 children suggests. The findings replicate those of a 2008 ponder of 13000 children conducted by the same US researchers. And while the earlier study did not factor in some potentially important variables that could have affected its results, this new one included them, said contribute to author Leeka Kheifets, an epidemiologist at the School of Public Health at the University of California at Los Angeles.

And “These new results back the previous research and reduce the probability that this could be a chance finding”. She stressed that the findings suggest, but do not prove, a connection between cell phone exposure and later behavior problems in kids. The study was published online Dec 6, 2010 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

In the study, Kheifets and her colleagues wrote that further studies are needed to “replicate or refute” their findings. “Although it is too early to interpret these results as causal,” they concluded, “we are solicitous that early exposure to cell phones could carry a risk, which, if real, would be of public health concern given the widespread use of the technology”. The researchers used material from 28,745 children enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC), which follows the health of 100000 Danish children born between 1996 and 2002, as well as the health of their mothers.

Almost half the children had no disclosure to cell phones at all, providing a good comparison group. The data included a questionnaire mothers completed when their children turned seven, which asked about family lifestyle, adolescence diseases, and cell phone use by children, among other health-related questions. The questionnaire included a standardized test designed to identify emotional or behavior problems, inattention or hyperactivity, or problems with other children.

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Scientists Are Studying The Problem Of Premature Infants. Part 3 of 3

Scientists Are Studying The Problem Of Premature Infants – Part 3 of 3

But many premature infants still have subtle problems that can be difficult to detect. “There’s a general shift away from simply ensuring the survival of these infants to how to give them the best quality of life. Our research is part of an deed to improve the outcomes for prematurely born infants and to identify earlier which babies are at greater risk monett.

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