Tag Archives: pediatrics

How To Prevent Infants At Risk For Autism. Part 2 of 2

How To Prevent Infants At Risk For Autism – Part 2 of 2

And “Children with autism typically receive therapy beginning at 3 to 4 years old. But our findings suggest that targeting the earliest risk markers of autism – such as lack of attention or reduced social interest or engagement – during the leading year of life may lessen the development of these symptoms later on”. Two experts agreed that early intervention is key. “Research has shown that subtle markers of autism are identifiable in the first year of life,” explained Dr Ron Marino, comrade chair of pediatrics at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, NY “Video feedback seems like a natural and potentially very potent extent of intervention when it can be most effective”.

attention

Dr Andrew Adesman is chief of developmental and behavioral pediatrics at Cohen Children’s Medical Center of New York, in New Hyde Park, NY He was cautiously bright about the promise of the video feedback approach. “Although it would be wonderful if a relatively simple, video-based intervention could reduce the recurrence risk of autism spectrum disorder in later offspring, further studies are needed to scrutinize this very issue greencoffeebeanmax. Those studies “will need to include a larger, more diverse sample population and need to look at developmental outcomes over a much longer period of time”.

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How To Prevent Infants At Risk For Autism. Part 1 of 2

How To Prevent Infants At Risk For Autism – Part 1 of 2

How To Prevent Infants At Risk For Autism. A group therapy involving “video feedback” – where parents watch videos of their interactions with their newborn – might help prevent infants at risk for autism from developing the disorder, a new study suggests. The research involved 54 families of babies who were at increased risk for autism because they had an older sibling with the condition. Some of the families were assigned to a analysis program in which a therapist used video feedback to help parents understand and respond to their infant’s individual communication style. The ideal of the therapy – delivered over five months while the infants were ages 7 to 10 months – was to improve the infant’s attention, communication, early language development, and collective engagement.

Other families were assigned to a control group that received no therapy. After five months, infants in the families in the video therapy group showed improvements in attention, engagement and societal behavior, according to the study published Jan 22, 2015 in The Lancet Psychiatry. Using the therapy during the baby’s first year of life may “modify the emergence of autism-related behaviors and symptoms,” tip-off author Jonathan Green, a professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of Manchester in England, said in a journal news release.

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A Smartphone And A Child’s Sleep. Part 3 of 3

A Smartphone And A Child’s Sleep – Part 3 of 3

Dr David Dunkin, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City, agreed. “There is a lot of compelling data, in both adults and adolescents, that matter-of-fact screens disrupt sleep cycles. And this may have an impact on long-term health. More studies lack to be done to look at all of the variables together”. Meanwhile pediatricians should share and support the academy’s advice when talking with parents about the presence of TVs and small screens bestvito.top.

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A Smartphone And A Child’s Sleep. Part 2 of 3

A Smartphone And A Child’s Sleep – Part 2 of 3

The children were in the fourth or seventh organize in one of 29 schools. More than two-thirds of the children were white, and heartlessly one-fifth were Hispanic. All were asked about electronic devices in the bedroom, what time they went to bed, what time they woke up, and how many days over the prior week they felt they needed more sleep. While kids with a bedroom TV said they got 18 minutes less beauty sleep on weeknights than those without a personal television, that figure rose to nearly 21 minutes for those who slept near a smartphone whether or not a TV was also present, the study found.

pediatrics

Going to bed with a smartphone at help was also linked to later bedtimes than having a bedroom TV: 37 minutes later compared to 31 minutes, the investigators said. And kids who slept with a smartphone were more indubitably to feel they needed more sleep than they were getting, compared with those with no smartphone present at bedtime. That perception of insufficient rest/sleep was not observed among children who only had a TV in the room.

So what’s a 21st century pater to do? Establishing technology ground-rules may help foster healthier sleep patterns, Falbe suggested. For example, parents can set nighttime “curfews” for electronic devices, bridle overall access to all screen time, and/or ban TVs and Internet-enabled devices from a child’s bedroom. “While more studies are needed to confirm these findings, our results provide additional maintain for current recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics that parents should be advised to set reasonable but firm limits on their child’s media use.

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A Smartphone And A Child’s Sleep. Part 1 of 3

A Smartphone And A Child’s Sleep – Part 1 of 3

A Smartphone And A Child’s Sleep. A smartphone in a child’s bedroom may bugger good sleep habits even more than a TV, new research suggests. A swotting of more than 2000 elementary and middle-school students found that having a smartphone or tablet in the bedroom was associated with less weekday sleep and feeling sleepy in the daytime. “Studies have shown that traditional screens and screen time, for instance TV viewing, can interfere with sleep, but much less is known about the impacts of smartphones and other small screens,” said study lead author Jennifer Falbe, of the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley. Small screens are of itemized concern because they provide access to a wide range of content, including games, videos, websites and texts, that can be used in bed and delay sleep.

They also exhale audible notifications of incoming communications that may interrupt sleep. “We found that both sleeping near a small screen and sleeping in a room with a TV set were related to shorter weekday sleep duration. Children who slept near a parsimonious screen, compared to those who did not, were also more likely to feel like they did not get enough sleep”. The findings were published online Jan 5, 2015 and in the February print issue of the almanac Pediatrics.

And “Despite the importance of sleep to child health, development and performance in school, many children are not sleeping enough. Preteen school-aged children need at least 10 hours of rest each day, while teenagers need between nine and 10, the US National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute advises. For this study, the researchers focused on the sleep habits of nearly 2050 boys and girls who had participated in the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration Study in 2012-2013.

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Children Watch Television Instead Of Games If Obese Mothers. Part 3 of 3

Children Watch Television Instead Of Games If Obese Mothers – Part 3 of 3

For these reasons, the American Academy of Pediatrics discourages TV viewing before the discretion of 2 years. Christakis noted that 50 percent of kids from this type of background start kindergarten lacking basic skills. “We know there is nothing better for young children’s brains than real-world accommodating interaction,” he said, adding that the brain develops in direct response to external stimulation.

The extended TV watching among these children comes at a big cost. “Both in terms of displaced exterior activity, such as play or being read to, but also television is overly stimulating – inappropriately stimulating to the developing brain”. Melissa Salgueiro, a psychologist at Miami Children’s Hospital, concurred that “children should not be exposed to TV before long time 2 generic prilosec otc price. Even then TV should be limited to 30 minutes per day, with parents finding other activities – such as play – to hush their children.

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Children Watch Television Instead Of Games If Obese Mothers. Part 2 of 3

Children Watch Television Instead Of Games If Obese Mothers – Part 2 of 3

Mothers with more tuition were less likely to keep the TV on during meals. Obese mothers are more likely to be inactive or suffer from depression. “They are more likely to use the television themselves, so their infants are exposed to more television as well”. Thompson is currently doing a muse about to see if play and other alternatives can help these moms get their babies away from the television.

children

Another expert said the study sheds more light on the issue of TV overexposure at such a young age. “This is further manifestation that certain children, particularly vulnerable children, have environments early on that are not conducive to optimizing their mental health,” said Dr Dimitri Christakis, director of the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at the Seattle Children’s Research Institute and a professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine.

That so many kids are watching TV primeval is “shocking and disconcerting”. He mucroniform out that children this age are awake for only 10 or 12 hours a day, but 40 percent of these kids are spending a third of their waking hours in front of a television. “In many cases they’re strapped in. Early small screen viewing is associated with attention problems and with cognitive delays, and it’s harmful to babies’ brain development”.

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