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The Larger Head Size Reduces Brain Atrophy In Alzheimer’s Disease. Part 3 of 3

The Larger Head Size Reduces Brain Atrophy In Alzheimer’s Disease – Part 3 of 3

The exploration doesn’t confirm that brain size and the speed of the disease are directly connected. But if there is a connection, what’s going on? “One possible explanation is that larger heads, and therefore larger brains, suppress more nerve cells and connections between cells,” reasoned study lead author Dr Robert Perneczky, a researcher at the Technical University of Munich in Germany.

Therefore more brain cells have to go to one’s reward before “the threshold is crossed where brain damage leads to cognitive impairment and other symptoms of dementia”. Roe, the neurology instructor, said the study appears to be valid and useful, adding that it suggests that three things are connected: genius size, the shrinking of the brain and the progression of Alzheimer’s disease helpful hints. Whatever your head size “the message is that the important thing is trying to also gaol your brain as healthy as possible throughout life, which hopefully will allow you to cope better with diseases like Alzheimer’s if they occur”.

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The Larger Head Size Reduces Brain Atrophy In Alzheimer’s Disease. Part 2 of 3

The Larger Head Size Reduces Brain Atrophy In Alzheimer’s Disease – Part 2 of 3

Nevertheless, there could be a connection between the size of the planner and how many neurons are available to “pick up the slack” when others go dark because of diseases such as Alzheimer’s. The new study, published in the July 13 issue of Neurology, explores that possibility.

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The study authors examined the medical records of 270 patients with Alzheimer’s. They looked for links between wisdom shrinkage, head circumference – an indicator of brain size – and the progression of their disease.

After adjusting their results so they wouldn’t be thrown off by factors such as the period and ethnicity of the patients, the researchers found that patients with larger head sizes tended toward less brain atrophy. Also, their dementia was less advanced. While the imbalance between larger-headed and smaller-headed people was significant from a statistical point of view, study co-author Farrer said it’s impossible to pinpoint exactly what the difference means in terms of how the brain works overall.

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The Larger Head Size Reduces Brain Atrophy In Alzheimer’s Disease. Part 1 of 3

The Larger Head Size Reduces Brain Atrophy In Alzheimer’s Disease – Part 1 of 3

The Larger Head Size Reduces Brain Atrophy In Alzheimer’s Disease. A changed study suggests that Alzheimer’s disease develops slower in population with bigger heads, perhaps because their larger brains have more cognitive power in reserve. It’s not certain that head size, brain size and the rate of worsening Alzheimer’s are linked. But if they are, the check in findings could pave the way for individualized treatment for the disease, said study co-author Lindsay Farrer, chief of the genetics program at Boston University School of Medicine.

The deciding goal is to catch Alzheimer’s early and use medications more effectively. “The prevailing view is that most of the drugs that are out there aren’t working because they’re being given to people when what’s happening in the brain is too far along”.

A century ago, some scientists believed that the condition of the head held secrets to a person’s intelligence and personality – those views have been since discounted. But today, research suggests that there may be “modest correlations” between brain size and smarts. Still, “there are many other factors that are associated with intelligence,” stressed Catherine Roe, a enquire instructor in neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis.

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Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease Observed Blunting Of Emotional Expression. Part 3 of 3

Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease Observed Blunting Of Emotional Expression – Part 3 of 3

Apathy seen in Alzheimer’s patients is often reported by strain members. “Apathy is a heartbreaker for the family”. Even so, both Kennedy and Heilman had a positive message for family members. For family, it’s not to take it personally if a loved one with Alzheimer’s is apathetic. “Don’t clarify it as being done willfully”.

Heilman said families can try to make information more explicit when talking to those with Alzheimer’s, in an effort to help emotions kick in. If you show a loved one a picture, for instance, give articulated details about the person or object in it, he suggested. You may see less apathy in response vimaxmale.men. The research was supported in part by Lundbeck Pharmaceutical Co, whose products embody Alzheimer’s medicine.

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Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease Observed Blunting Of Emotional Expression. Part 2 of 3

Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease Observed Blunting Of Emotional Expression – Part 2 of 3

They didn’t find the pleasant pictures (such as babies and puppies) as fine as did the healthy participants. They found the negative pictures (snakes, spiders) less negative. “If you have a blunted emotion, people will say you look withdrawn”. One important take-home word is for families and physicians not to automatically think a patient with blunted emotions is depressed and ask for or prescribe antidepressants without a thorough evaluation first.

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Exactly why this blunting of emotions may occur isn’t known. He speculates there may be a discredit of part of the brain or loss of control of part of the brain important for experiencing emotion. Or a neurotransmitter important for experiencing emotion may undergo degradation.

What the discovery suggests is that as the memory goes, so does some emotion, said Dr Gary Kennedy, a geriatric psychiatrist at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City, who reviewed the findings. “Emotion and respect go together. The more emotion you can attach to an event, the more likely you are to remember. I think what this paper is telling us is that the disease is causing the emotional response to become more and more shallow over time”.

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Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease Observed Blunting Of Emotional Expression. Part 1 of 3

Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease Observed Blunting Of Emotional Expression – Part 1 of 3

Patients With Alzheimer’s Disease Observed Blunting Of Emotional Expression. Patients with Alzheimer’s cancer often can seem withdrawn and apathetic, symptoms frequently attributed to memory problems or hardship finding the right words. But patients with the progressive brain disorder may also have a reduced ability to experience emotions, a new study suggests. When researchers from the University of Florida and other institutions showed a negligible group of Alzheimer’s patients 10 positive and 10 negative pictures, and asked them to rate them as pleasant or unpleasant, they reacted with less intensity than did the group of healthy participants.

And “For the most part, they seemed to hear the emotion normally evoked from the picture they were looking at ,” said Dr Kenneth Heilman, senior author of the study and a professor of neurology at the University of Florida’s McKnight Brain Institute. But their reactions were singular from those of the healthy participants. “Even when they comprehended the scene, their emotional reaction was very blunted”. The study is published online in the Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences.

The analyse participants – seven with Alzheimer’s and eight without – made a mark on a piece of paper that had a happy face on one end and a sad one on the other, putting the mark closer to the on cloud nine face the more pleasing they found the picture and closer to the sad face the more distressing. Compared to the healthy participants, those with Alzheimer’s found the pictures less intense.

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The Gene Responsible For Alzheimer’s Disease. Part 2 of 2

The Gene Responsible For Alzheimer’s Disease – Part 2 of 2

So “These insights could lead to a new era in prevention and treatment”. As many as 5 million Americans aged 65 and older have Alzheimer’s disease, and that slew is expected to grow significantly as the baby boomer generation ages. Genome sequencing is considered a key strategy for identifying new clues to the cause of Alzheimer’s.

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The clues would come from differences in the contract for of DNA letters in Alzheimer’s patients when compared to people without the disease, according to the NIH. The National Alzheimer’s Project Act, which became law in 2011, is meant to boost efforts to combat the disease. It calls for more experiment with by both the public and private sectors, along with expanded access to clinical and long-term care. One of the first actions taken by the NIH under the act was funding a series of studies, including this genome-sequencing effort peyronie’s disease specialist georgia. More dirt The US National Institute on Aging has more about Alzheimer’s disease.

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