Deadly Intestinal Infection. Part 1 of 3

Deadly Intestinal Infection – Part 1 of 3

Deadly Intestinal Infection. Increased efforts to stop to the spread of an intestinal superbug aren’t having a major impact, according to a national survey of infection prevention specialists in the United States. Hospitals and other vigour care facilities need to do even more to reduce rates of Clostridium difficile infection, including hiring more infection prevention staff and improving monitoring of cleaning efforts, according to the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). Each year, about 14000 Americans checks from C difficile infection.

Deaths related to C difficile infection rose 400 percent between 2000 and 2007, partly due to the aspect of a stronger strain, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, the infections add at least $1 billion a year to US condition care costs. In January, 2013, APIC surveyed 1100 members and found that 70 percent said their health care facilities had adopted additional measures to arrest C difficile infections since March 2010.

However, only 42 percent of respondents said C difficile infection rates at their facilities had declined, while 43 percent said there was no decrease, according to the findings presented Monday at an APIC symposium on C difficile, held in Baltimore. Despite the fact that C difficile infection rates have reached all-time highs in recent years, only 21 percent of haleness care facilities have added more infection prevention staff to tackle the problem, the survey found.

Parts: 1 2 3

2 thoughts on “Deadly Intestinal Infection. Part 1 of 3

  1. Pingback: Deadly Intestinal Infection. Part 2 of 3 | Steven Griffin MD

  2. Pingback: Deadly Intestinal Infection. Part 3 of 3 | Steven Griffin MD

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