Error Correction System Of The Human Brain Makes It Possible To Develop New Prostheses. Part 1 of 3

Error Correction System Of The Human Brain Makes It Possible To Develop New Prostheses – Part 1 of 3

Error Correction System Of The Human Brain Makes It Possible To Develop New Prostheses. A altered study provides perceptiveness into the brain’s ability to detect and correct errors, such as typos, even when someone is working on “autopilot”. Researchers had three groups of 24 skilled typists use a computer keyboard. Without the typists’ knowledge, the researchers either inserted typographical errors or removed them from the typed printed matter on the screen.

They discovered that the typists’ brains realized they’d made typos even if the screen suggested otherwise and they didn’t consciously clear the errors weren’t theirs, even accepting responsibility for them. “Your fingers notice that they make an error and they slow down, whether we corrected the error or not,” said study lead prime mover Gordon D Logan, a professor of psychology at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn.

The idea of the study is to understand how the brain and body interact with the environment and break down the process of automatic behavior. “If I want to initiate up my coffee cup, I have a goal in mind that leads me to look at it, leads my arm to reach toward it and drink it. This involves a kind of feedback loop. We want to manner at more complex actions than that”.

Parts: 1 2 3

2 thoughts on “Error Correction System Of The Human Brain Makes It Possible To Develop New Prostheses. Part 1 of 3

  1. Pingback: Error Correction System Of The Human Brain Makes It Possible To Develop New Prostheses. Part 2 of 3 | Steven Griffin MD

  2. Pingback: Error Correction System Of The Human Brain Makes It Possible To Develop New Prostheses. Part 3 of 3 | Steven Griffin MD

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