Using Non-Recommended Drugs For The Treatment Of Diabetes. Part 2 of 3

Using Non-Recommended Drugs For The Treatment Of Diabetes – Part 2 of 3

Another factor could be the policy of state health guaranty plans, including Medicaid, in terms of covering drugs. Also, prominent doctors in given areas can influence the choice of drugs other doctors make. And drug-company marketing may play a role. “At this locale we don’t have good insight into these differences”.

patients

This problem isn’t unique to Avandia. “This is not uncommon with a lot of drugs. This is a good case example”. The report was published in the Nov 17, 2010 print run of the New England Journal of Medicine.

The study also found that the American Diabetes Association’s January 2009 consensus statement advising against prescribing Avandia appeared to have had a “negligible influence” on trends in its use. The examine authors think the FDA could do a better job of alerting all doctors about warning labels. “The FDA could provide a tool for doctors and patients to show the risks and benefits of effective on the drug”.

As for Avandia, in September the FDA introduced further restrictions on use of the drug. The agency is requiring Avandia’s maker, GlaxoSmithKline, to develop a program that will limit access to the dull to patients for whom other treatments have not worked. Also, doctors will have to state and document a patient’s eligibility to use Avandia. They will also have to tell patients about the cardiovascular safety risks associated with Avandia, and patients will have to accede that they understand those risks.

Parts: 1 2 3

2 thoughts on “Using Non-Recommended Drugs For The Treatment Of Diabetes. Part 2 of 3

  1. Pingback: Using Non-Recommended Drugs For The Treatment Of Diabetes. Part 1 of 3 | Steven Griffin MD

  2. Pingback: Using Non-Recommended Drugs For The Treatment Of Diabetes. Part 3 of 3 | Steven Griffin MD

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