Surviving Of Extremely Premature Infants. Part 2 of 3

Surviving Of Extremely Premature Infants – Part 2 of 3

So “However, the spectrum of mental development impairment is quite capricious and families often are willing to accept some mental developmental impairment if this means that their infant will survive to go home”. The report was published Jan 22, 2015 in the New England Journal of Medicine. Dr Edward McCabe, medical president of the March of Dimes, said that although the survival rate of premature infants is increasing, the goal of any pregnancy should be to deliver the baby at 38 to 42 weeks of gestation.

impairment

And “The later these babies are born, the better they will do. When the condition of the baby or mom is not at risk, the best incubator that has been developed is the mother’s womb. For the study, Patel’s team analyzed material from more than 6000 deaths among more than 22000 live births with gestational ages of 22 to 28 weeks. The births occurred between 2000 and 2011. The babies were followed from birth for 120 days, or until they died, larboard the hospital or were transferred to another hospital.

Infants hospitalized for more than 120 days were evaluated until they died or until they turned 1 year, according to the study. During the study period, the death gait for extremely premature infants dropped by nearly 10 percent. By 2008 to 2011, the death rate was about 26 percent, the study found. Overall, 40 percent of the deaths happened within 12 hours after birth. Another 17 percent happened after 28 days.

The largest declines in deaths were in those born at 23 or 24 weeks of gestation. The falling off in deaths from breathing complications made up 53 percent of the overall reduction in deaths. Deaths from infections, perturbed system problems and developmental delays also dropped. But deaths from necrotizing enterocolitis increased and those deaths counterbalance the overall decrease in deaths by 26 percent.

Parts: 1 2 3

2 thoughts on “Surviving Of Extremely Premature Infants. Part 2 of 3

  1. Pingback: Surviving Of Extremely Premature Infants. Part 1 of 3 | Steven Griffin MD

  2. Pingback: Surviving Of Extremely Premature Infants. Part 3 of 3 | Steven Griffin MD

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